Long Term Consistency > Short Term Intensity


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I believe that what we desire is no secret at all; we all know what we truly desire, what we lack is to have purpose for the passions in life. How often do we just do things fully knowing that we are not satisfied with it? How often do we get up for a job we hate?

“The secret of success is consistency of purpose” – Benjamin Disraeli

What if I told you that our brain is wired to trick us into “justifying” doing something we are less than passionate for or things that we may even despise. Our brain has literately thousands of functions however one takes priority over all of them. That is to keep us safe and to see potential threats, the brain sees stress, any stress without judgments.

It will not differentiate one stress from another, so you go to that job daily even though you hate it because your brain knows it’s safe.

No change = safety for the brain and the brain love to feel safe!

Finding what your passionate about and courageously chasing it goes against what the brain says is safe, so the brain (being smart) sets little road blocks up to sabotage your success. It comes in the form of micro thoughts or hesitation.. In that millisecond thought “what if” you have already set in motion the degradation of being successful at the task you are about to face.

I fail at this all the time, but I’m learning to stop the little “what if” thoughts and just think to myself “why not” and push to get out of my ruts. This is where consistency comes in, consistency trains the brain that the particular stress is acceptable and safe.

When I started lifting I failed to push myself, not because I didn’t desire results but because my brain was attempting to save my body from harm. Now when I skip a day of lifting I desire to get back in the gym the next day for sure. My brain doesn’t fight me; consistency has told my brain it’s safe.

This can apply to almost all areas of life, being consistent at anything is the only way to improve and believing it’s ok to fail, taking breaks and getting back into whatever it is that you are passionate about is a success, quitting is a failure.

That is why so many diets fail, it’s not because we don’t want to lose the weight. It’s our brain seeing the diet as a stress or threat and slowly over time justifying that one cheat meal that turns into a skipped day, that you will eventually let a week pass by and at that point the brain rewords you with a little pat on the back for the danger you avoided.

Consistency will re-train the brain and trick it into thinking that the “stress” of the diet or task is safe and acceptable to give energy to.

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